Aug
25
2009

NOVA ScienceNOW Web site

Screen capture from Marathon Mouse activity.

Screen capture from Marathon Mouse activity.

Picking up on Kirk’s very goo dsuggestion, I spent some time this weekend, exploring the NOVA Science Now web site. If you haven’t yet visited it, it’s worth a look.  Here’s the link to the main page.

I particularly liked this page, which includes a little activity called Marathon Mouse, where students learn about new drugs that seem to have the benefits of exercise.  The activity features some scientists from the Salk Institute and the work they do with genes and metabolism.  The activities themselves are nicely done – simple and a little whimsical (a silly, hand-drawn mouse that you experiment with).  And if you want to show students a news article, to illustrate the way this research was covered by the press, here’s a BBC article on the same research.  Also off this page are also a few nice videos, an “ask the expert” page, teacher’s guides, and other resources.

In addition to the metabolism material, I found the Science News feed (which many of you may already subscribe to) as well as a series of interesting-sounding podcasts.

There’s also a handy archive page of all the past NOVA programs (organized by topic area) that you’re already familiar with, but might want to send students to (Typhoid Mary, Mirror Neurons, Stem Calls, Secrets of the Mind, Sleep, etc.).

Anyway, some good stuff here. I’d be interested to hear what you all think of this.

Written by rheyden in: Teaching Tools | Tags:
Aug
23
2009

Using an Online Community

kbrown2When teachers go online, one of the things that they are looking for is great resources for teaching.  If each teacher were to find just one of their favorite resources that they always point their students towards, then together we could amass an amazing list of great teaching tools that we can all untilize.  I think that with a list of great sites to visit we might all be a little more enthusiastic to teach with these new ideas and experiences for our students.  I think we can use a blog to explore sites and tools especially in areas that our students struggle. 

I will start with just two.  There are some great annotated web links that help our students understand concepts.  Go to http://nhscience.lonestar.edu/biol/bio1int.htm and look at the organized list of animations that Lone Star College has put together.  This would take some time and my students love to look at these animations from across the web. 

The second site is the Genetics Education Center at Kansas University Medical Center.  Debra Collins has been updating this site for years and it is a great source for all things Genetic. http://www.kumc.edu/gec/

Check these out.  If you have not visited them, do so and share some of your own.

I hope you are all having a great start to your year.

Kirk

Written by kbrown in: Teaching Tools |
Aug
23
2009

E-Rate Funding to Re-Imagine Schools

Meet Chris Lehmann, Principal of the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia, PA. Lehmann is a interesting guy – he started out as a High School English teacher and technology coordinator.  Over the years, his abiding interest in and thoughtful blog (Practical Theory:  A View From the Classroom) about new technologies applied to teaching and learning has put him in the national spotlight.  On 8.20.09 he gave a talk at the FCC National Broadband Planning Workshop in Washington, DC.   The blog entry I’ve linked you to includes the ustream video of his talk as well as his notes.

I found his talk inspiring. I particularly appreciated his very well articulated point, that if all we do with new broadband technologies is find a more efficient way to deliver content, we are missing the boat. What do you think?

Written by rheyden in: Teaching Tools | Tags: ,
Aug
14
2009

Past NABT President to receive award

PRHorn

Link

Washington, D.C.—Scientist, teacher, and co-director of the Carnegie Academy for Science Education (CASE), Toby Horn, will receive the 2009 Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science Education from the American Society for Cell Biology at their December meeting….more